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A Quick Tour of Photoshop Elements

Article Description

If you're new to Photoshop Elements, this lesson will familiarize you with the Adobe Photoshop Elements 7 workspace and provide you with an overview of the tools and procedures you’ll use to capture and edit your digital images.

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Importing media

Bringing your digital files into Photoshop Elements is easy.

Getting photos

To view and organize your photos in Photoshop Elements, you first need to import them into your catalog. You can bring photos into Photoshop Elements from a variety of sources and in several different ways:

  • Bring images from your camera or card reader directly into the Photoshop Elements Organizer using the Adobe Photo Downloader. Getting photos directly in this way will save you time and enable you to start working with them sooner.
  • Download pictures to your hard disk using the software that came with your digital camera, and then bring them into Photoshop Elements using the Get Photos And Videos > From Files And Folders command. If you prefer to work with other software to import your files to your computer, you’ll first need to disable Adobe Photo Downloader. To disable the Adobe Photo Downloader, click its icon (photodownloader.jpg) in the task bar, and then choose Disable. Do this only if you plan to use other software to import images to your computer.
  • If your camera or card reader is displayed as a drive in Windows Explorer, you can drag the files to a folder on your hard disk, and then bring them into Photoshop Elements using the Get Photos And Videos > From Files And Folders command.

In most cases, you’ll need to install the software drivers that came with your camera before you can download pictures to your computer. You may also need to set up the Photoshop Elements Camera or Card Reader Preferences. See “Getting photos” in Lesson 2, “Basic Organizing.”

Creating a new catalog

Photoshop Elements stores information about your images in catalog files, which manage the photos on your computer but are independent of the image files themselves. As well as digital photographs, a catalog can include video and audio files, scans, PDF documents, and any presentations and layouts you might create in Photoshop Elements such as slide shows, photo collages, and CD jacket designs. When you sort and group your media in Photoshop Elements, all your work is recorded in the catalog. A single catalog can efficiently handle thousands of files, but you can also create separate catalogs for different types of work.

  1. Start Photoshop Elements, either by double-clicking the shortcut on your desktop or by choosing Start > All Programs > Adobe Photoshop Elements 7.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • If the Welcome Screen appears, click Organize in the row of shortcut buttons across the top of the Welcome Screen, and then wait until the Organizer has finished opening.
    • If the Photoshop Elements Editor window opens without first displaying the Welcome Screen, click the Welcome Screen button (welcomebutton.jpg) located at the left in the menu bar to display the Welcome Screen, and then click Organize. Or, click the Organizer button (organizer_button.jpg) located at the right in the menu bar. Wait until the Organizer has finished opening.
    • If the Photoshop Elements Organizer window opens without first displaying the Welcome Screen you are ready to continue with step 3.
  3. In the Organizer window, choose File > Catalog.
  4. In the Catalog Manager dialog box, click New.
  5. In the Enter A Name For The New Catalog dialog box, type Lesson1 for the catalog name, disable the option Import Free Music Into This Catalog, and then click OK.

    Now you have a special catalog that you’ll use just for this lesson. All you need is some pictures to put in it.

4. Using the Adobe Photo Downloader | Next Section Previous Section