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Image Editing Basics for Adobe Photoshop Elements 13

Chapter Description

This lesson from Adobe Photoshop Elements 13 Classroom in a Book begins with an overview of the core concepts behind image correction, and then introduces a range of quick and easy techniques to help you get more from your photos in just a few clicks.

Review answers

  1. Expert mode provides the most flexible and powerful image-correction environment, with lighting and color-correction commands and tools for fixing image defects, making selections, adding text, and painting on your images. Quick edit provides easy access to a range of basic image-editing controls for quickly making common adjustments and corrections. If you’re new to digital photography, Guided edit steps you through each procedure to help you get professional-looking results.
  2. Yes; the Enhance menu in Expert mode contains commands that are equivalent to the Auto buttons in the Quick Edit adjustments panel: Auto Smart Fix, Auto Levels, Auto Contrast, Auto Color Correction, as well as Auto Red Eye Fix. The Enhance menu also provides an Adjust Smart Fix command, which opens a dialog in which you can specify settings for automatic adjustments.
  3. The Photo Bin provides easy access to the photos you want to work with, without needing to leave the Editor workspace. You can set the Photo Bin to display all the photos that are currently selected in the Media Browser, just those images that are open in the Editor (helpful when some of the open images are hidden behind the front window), or the entire contents of any album in your catalog.
  4. The Smart Brush is both a selection tool and an image-adjustment tool—it creates a selection based on similarities in color and texture, through which your choice of editing preset is applied. You can choose from close to seventy Smart Brush presets, each of which can be customized, applied repeatedly for a cumulative effect, or layered with other adjustment presets to produce an almost infinite variety of results.
  5. If an image’s color temperature is too warm or too cool, it will have either a orange-red or blue color cast. A yellow-green or magenta color cast is referred to as a tint.