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Creating Vector Art with Adobe Shape and Adobe Illustrator

Contents

  1. Exploring Adobe Shape
  2. Editing in Adobe Illustrator (or Photoshop)
  3. Final Thoughts

Article Description

With the release of Adobe Shape, capturing inspiration in the form of vector art just got easier. Adobe Shape traces images you capture from different sources and the resulting vector artwork can be shared with others or brought to Illustrator and edited. In this article, web developer Brian Wood looks at how Adobe Shape works and follows an Adobe Shape to Illustrator workflow.

Editing in Adobe Illustrator (or Photoshop)

In the latest version of Adobe Illustrator CC (or Photoshop CC), you can open the Libraries panel (Window > Libraries) and after syncing is complete, you can see the traced artwork in your library (with the right library chosen). If you hover over the item in the Libraries panel list, you can see a tooltip (see Figure 14) that tells you it was created with Adobe Shape.

Figure 14

Figure 14 The traced artwork in the Libraries panel

The artwork in the Libraries panel shows as SVG, which means vector. If you drag the artwork from the Libraries panel into your document, the artwork becomes paths in Illustrator and an embedded smart object in Photoshop (see Figure 15). Editing the smart object in Photoshop will open a PDF file.

Figure 15

Figure 15 Dragging the traced artwork from the Libraries panel into Illustrator

Once you drag the artwork onto an artboard in Illustrator, you can continue editing using the program. Here are a few things to note, currently, about artwork created by Adobe Shape that is dragged into Illustrator:

  • The traced artwork typically comes in as a single group in Illustrator.
  • Most “closed” paths are compound paths.
  • There really are no stroked paths, only closed paths with fills (currently).

One thing you can’t do is update the SVG in the library that was created by Adobe Shape. So most of the time, I will drag the SVG from the Libraries panel into Illustrator, make my changes, and then add it to the library again. When artwork is added to a library from within Illustrator, you can then double-click the item in the Libraries panel and make edits in Illustrator (but not Photoshop).

3. Final Thoughts | Next Section Previous Section