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Removing Camera Shake with the Photoshop CC Shake Reduction Filter

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No way to steady your camera for a shot? You could increase the ISO or shutter speed, or brace yourself against a tree or wall, and the image might look sharp, but even subtle lens movement can blur edge details. Finally, Photoshop has a reliable way to address this problem! Photoshop educator Dan Moughamian shows how the new Shake Reduction filter in Photoshop CC can help you reclaim some of those blurred pixels.

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Adobe Camera Raw Processing Considerations

Adobe Camera Raw Processing Considerations

When starting with Adobe Camera Raw (ACR), it's important to think about the other types of corrections you're making, which might later affect shake reduction output quality. Specifically, pay attention to other kinds of distortions (and noise) in your photo that might need fixing before you attempt to fix things with Shake Reduction.

No rule will always produce the same result, but my preference is to use Lens Profile Corrections and, when necessary, the new Upright feature before using Shake Reduction. The more you can do in the raw pipeline to flatten the perspective and reduce distortions, the cleaner your results are likely to be. I also recommend following your standard noise-reduction and capture-sharpening process, but you don't need to increase the intensity of those settings to mitigate pixels that have been blurred by camera shake.

For this example, the raw processing was straightforward. I applied the following optimizations: tone-mapping improvements via the Basic panel, a Lens Profile Correction (see Figure 2), CA correction, and a modest amount of noise reduction and capture sharpening via ACR.

Figure 2 Follow your normal ACR routine, and apply Lens Profile corrections where necessary, but avoid trying to remove motion-based blurring or artifacts via the capture sharpening controls. They're not designed for it.

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